Invest In Yourself

The featured image was taken in the spring of 1991 at my second “real” job. I was sixteen years old.  

Investing in yourself—in your success, financial security, and happiness—is perhaps the surest way to achieve an optimal sense of worthThis is the thesis that will emerge as I develop the post. 

Since I started working at the age of fifteen, I have had thirty-two (32) jobs. That number does not include the multiple odd jobs I picked up every so often to earn extra bucks. My career path shows a distinct pattern of job-hopping, which has its basis in moving out of state or country on the average of every three years.

It would seem that at age forty-two, one would be settled in an occupation counting down the years until retirement. But nope, not me. The way I look at my career path is that I’ve had over thirty-two opportunities to figure out what I’d love to be doing for the rest of my life. While I did not particularly enjoy most of those jobs, I learned invaluable lessons that have undoubtedly prepared me to move from employer dependency to being financially self-sufficient.

Although I do not live my life looking backward, if I had an opportunity for a career do-over, I would not work for anyone, which is the first lesson I’d like to expound on.

For twenty-seven years (age 15-42), I gave my time, energy, and effort to employers who saw me as a disposable commodity. I believe that’s the biggest mistake many people make when they settle into a career, which is to be dependent on an employer for their financial security.

Putting aside this one-sided dependent relationship, think of what I could have accomplished in twenty-seven years had I invested those years in building my own brand.

Investing in oneself is arguably the best return on investment a person can have. In an interview with Forbes, billionaire investor Warren Buffett maintained, “You’ll have a more rewarding life not only in terms of how much money you make, but how much fun you have out of life; you’ll make more friends the more interesting person you are. So go for it, invest in yourself.”

We will continue the topic of Investing in Yourself in an upcoming post titled: How to Escape Salary Slavery.

 

 

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23 thoughts on “Invest In Yourself

  1. I agree, we should invest in ourselves because there’ s a greater gain. But many don’t know how to invest in themselves, because the fear of not getting the rate of investment back instantly. Sometimes we get it back the second year or third. Some don’t talk about the failure or what they did to become successful. How did you overcome failure if you experience any?

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Julie, the word “instantly” does not exist in the success universe. Experiencing sustained levels of success takes time and requires patience. Here’s a video I recommend for every twenty-something-year-old out there. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qRj144Gd7EA&t=15s

      To your question about overcoming failure. Whenever I pursue any success initiative, I do not think about failure. I focus on my effort. And if/when an obstacle or setback presents itself, then I adapt and make adjustments. Where your focus goes, your energy flows. Whatever you think about all the time, you will attract into your life.

      So the options are: Focus on failure and lose. Or focus on effort and win. 🙂

      Liked by 2 people

  2. Josiah, you hit the nail right on the head with this one. “think of what I could have accomplished in twenty-seven years had I invested those years in building my own brand.” That is an extremely profound reflection. I agree with you, it’s not about living with regret and looking backwards, it’s about learning that the investments we make in ourselves in present moment is more than worth the effort, time, and energy. Because in another 5, 10, 15, 20+ years of self-investment and building, who knows how much we can accomplish, and if we do nothing, we know exactly how much we’ll accomplish.

    Thanks for this post. I often battle my own mind at times and have to remind myself to persist. It’s much appreciated to read a post from someone else who shares the same sentiments on focusing on the efforts in the present moment.

    Liked by 2 people

  3. That’s fantastic Josiah. And you’re never too old to keep looking. At 57 I started to learn to play the violin and at 59 I started a new job. Last week, this 60 year old joined Toastmasters. Living life the way you want to till your last breath makes it all the more satisfying.

    Liked by 1 person

  4. Most times life doesn’t follow a straight line. All your jobs (32!) made you the person you are today, with the skills and knowledge it takes to go for your own brand… even though you were working for others…

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Thank you for sharing this! I recently decided to take more time out of my other obligations to invest in the passions and causes I care about, and reading this today gave me a lot of encouragement and reassurance for my decision.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. It is my pleasure! Although investing in oneself can be a bit of a tug-of-war, doing so will inevitably lead to profitable returns as it relates to your happiness and personal and professional success. Best wishes! 🙏🏽

      Like

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